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HomeGalleriesAbout George PerinaContactBuy ImagesGuide to Underwater Photography

   
     Digital Photography Basics
 
     Film vs. Digital
 
     Underwater Photography
 
     Underwater Housings
 
     Underwater Strobes
 
     Lenses
 
     50/50 Photography
 
     Tips and Tricks
 
     Care & Maintenance
 
     Suggested Reading
 
     Recommended Software
 
     My Equipment
 
     Useful Links
 
 


Underwater Photography
(continued)

Anyone with a serious interest in photography knows that getting the right picture is a matter of skill, patience and concentration. 

A photographer who is not at completely at ease in the water, especially one who hasn't mastered the benefits of neutral buoyancy, will never control the situation long enough to compose a good picture

Uncontrolled ascents or descents are not only dangerous to the diver, but they put the photographer in a situation of only being able to take rapid "grab" shot as the subject and photographer part ways. 
 

2. Never Chase the Subject:
This is one of those pearls of wisdom that will go ignored until the beginning photographer realizes how much time has been spent on taking pictures that are not worth keeping. 

Chasing after fish is pointless. They can swim faster than a diver, which generally means that the photographer winds up with a extensive collection of fish tail images.  Front and side views make the most pleasing marine life images, and they require patience and a slow approach to the subjects.

In life patience is a virtue; in photography it is requirement; in underwater photography it is a necessity.

 

Rather than go after the fish, have the fish come to you, which goes back to the previous points:  master dive skills, be relaxed in the water, and have patience. Fish will acclimate themselves to a diver's presence, especially if the diver is calm and non-threatening.

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